Thursday, December 20, 2012

George Washington Carver


George Washington Carver




George Washington Carver (January 1864 – January 5, 1943), was an African American scientist, botanist, teacher, and inventor whose work revolutionized agriculture in the Southern United States.

When Slave holders Moses and Susan Carver moved to Southwest Missouri they built a small 12' x 12' cabin. Eventually that same cabin was inhabited by an enslaved girl named Mary. She gave birth to George towards the end of the Civil War. George’s exact birth day and year are unknown, but it is known that his birth was before Missouri slavery was abolished in January, 1864. 


The National Basketball Retired Players Association (NBRPA), the only alumni association comprised of former NBA, ABA, Harlem Globetrotter and WNBA players, is commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the 150th Anniversary of the 13th Amendment  – in conjunction with the University Honors Program at Loyola University New Orleans and ELEVATE, an academic, athletic and mentoring program for inner-city teens – by issuing a one-of-a-kind limited edition print of Martin Luther King's “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” signed by Dr. King and more than 50 former NBA players. This unique, historic, limited edition print is the perfect collectible for any history and/or sports fanatic.   The 1000 special edition “Path to Freedom” prints are only available as a gift, limit one per patron, for tax-deductible donations of $100.00 or more placed at www.SpecialEdition.us 

As a young child, George’s interest in plants was evident earning the nickname of "Plant Doctor” due to his careful tending to a secret garden of cotton depleted.  Here he experimented with different types of plants that ultimately formed a burning desire in George for a scientific education tailored to understand and aid him in unlocking  botanical secrets.

In the late 18th Century, the boll weevil destroyed much of the cotton crop that was not faring well in the depleted soil. His experiments and successes resulted in poor farmers planting his alternative crops which thrived becoming a food source, not only for their family’s food, but for area consumers.  

George Washington Carver (front row, center) pictured with fellow teachers and colleagues at the Tuskegee Institute  in Alabama Circa 1902

Booker T. Washington, the president of the Tuskegee Institute, invited Carver to head its Agriculture Department in 1896. For 47 years, Carver taught at Tuskegee developing the department into a strong research center.  Carver developed and published unique uses for his thriving crops which improved their marketability.  His most popular bulletin contained 105 existing food recipes that required the use of peanuts.  He also created and/or disseminated over 100 peanut products that were useful for the house and family farm, including cosmetics, dyes, paints, plastics, gasoline, and nitroglycerin.



He taught methods of crop rotation, perfected the selection of alternative cash crops for farmers that would improve the cotton depleted soil.  He took his classroom on the road, thanks to Morris Ketchum Jesup, who provided the funding.  The "Jesup wagon "taught generations of black students as well as family farmer  agricultural techniques for self-sufficiency.



In addition to his work on agricultural experimentation his other accomplishments included improvement of racial relations, mentoring children, poetry, painting, and religion. His example of hard work, maintaining a positive mental attitude, and thirst for good education was infectious for all who knew him. His humility, genuine interest in others, good nature, thrift, and generosity was evident and admired widely.

George Washington Carver "One of America's great scientists." U.S. World War II poster circa 1943

He, early in the civil rights movement, shattered the widespread stereotype that the black race was intellectually inferior to the white race. In 1941, Time magazine dubbed him a "Black Leonardo", a reference to the white polymath Leonardo da Vinci. To commemorate his life and inventions, George Washington Carver Recognition Day is celebrated on January 5, the anniversary of the day Carver died.



By: Stanley Yavneh Klos

  • First United American Republic: United Colonies of North America: 13 British Colonies United in Congress was founded by 12 colonies on September 5th, 1774 (Georgia joined in 1775)  and governed through a British Colonial Continental Congress.  Peyton Randolph and George Washington served, respectively, as the Republic's first President and Commander-in-Chief;
  • Second United American Republic: The United States of America: 13 Independent States United in Congress was founded by 12 states on July 2nd, 1776 (New York abstained until July 9th), and governed through the United States Continental CongressJohn Hancock and George Washington served, respectively, as the Republic's first President and Commander-in-Chief; 
  • Third United American Republic: The United States of America: A Perpetual Union was founded by 13 States on March 1st, 1781, with the enactment of the first U.S. Constitution, the Articles of Confederation, and governed through the United States in Congress Assembled.  Samuel Huntington and George Washington served, respectively, as the Republic's first President and Commander-in-Chief; 
  • Fourth United American Republic: The United States of America: We the People  was formed by 11 states on March 4th, 1789 (North Carolina and Rhode Island joined in November 1789 and May 1790, respectively), with the enactment of the U.S. Constitution of 1787. The fourth and current United States Republic governs through  the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate in Congress Assembled, the U.S. President and Commander-in-Chief, and the U.S. Supreme Court.  George Washington served as the Republic's first President and Commander-in-Chief.





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